Waconia, Minn. (Dec. 5, 2016) – Driven to continually improve patient care, Ridgeview Medical Center today announced a partnership with Twin Cities-based pharmacogenomics company OneOme, developer of the RightMed test. Through this partnership, Ridgeview patients will have an opportunity to receive personalized prescription treatment options.

Studies show that approximately 50 percent of the 4 billion prescriptions issued each year in the United States do not work as intended for patients. In addition, adverse drug reactions are the fourth leading cause of death and account for seven percent of hospital admissions and 20 percent of readmissions nationwide.

The RightMed test is a cost-effective, comprehensive, and clinically actionable pharmacogenomic test covering 22 genes, which can be provided as a part of routine clinical care. Pharmacogenomics is the study of how genes affect a person’s response to drugs. The relatively new field combines pharmacology (the science of drugs) and genomics (the study of genes and their functions) to develop effective, safe medications and doses tailored to a person’s genetic makeup. RightMed helps health care providers make timely, evidenced-based, personalized prescription treatment decisions for more than 340 medications.

“As the field of genomics continues to evolve, we’re able to use a person’s genetic profile to learn more about how an individual’s DNA influences his or her health,” said Robert Stevens, president and CEO, Ridgeview Medical Center. “By offering the RightMed test to our patients, we will gain specific understanding of how each individual metabolizes prescription drugs. This will help our providers better determine the ‘right’ prescription options for each person, and reduce potential side effects and unintended interactions between other drugs. We are very pleased to partner with OneOme to bring this valuable service to our patients.”

The cheek-swab test is available to Ridgeview Clinic patients at select sites for $300; however, those who may benefit most include: those who take some classes of medication, such as cardiovascular prescriptions; those who are struggling with adverse drug reactions, unwanted side effects, medications that are not working; or those who are on multiple medications.

“We are thrilled that Ridgeview Medical Center has partnered with OneOme to offer this testing to their patients. Precision medicine aims to give providers the ability to make better informed care decisions across multiple disease areas,” said Paul Owen, CEO of OneOme. “It’s our mission to deliver the most cost-effective pharmacogenomic testing and tools for all providers across the globe to use in everyday patient care, and the addition of partners - such as Ridgeview - help make these insights accessible to patients.”

Available worldwide, RightMed is currently in use by Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine (CIM); in Canada through OneOme’s partnership with Medcan, Canada’s largest executive health clinic and a global leader in assessing clients’ overall well-being; and in Puerto Rico, Cuba and Dominican Republic through a partnership with High Profile Laboratory in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico.

Ridgeview Medical Center is an independent, nonprofit, regional health care system located 35 minutes west of Minneapolis. Its network includes two hospitals—located in Waconia and Arlington—a multitude of primary and specialty care clinics, emergency services and specialty programs, and Two Twelve Medical Center in Chaska—a free-standing 24/7 emergency and urgent care facility with multispecialty clinics and services.
The OneOme platform was co-developed and exclusively licensed from Mayo Clinic to bring pharmacogenomics into routine clinical care. OneOme is a privately held company backed by early-stage venture firm Invenshure, LLC, and Mayo Clinic.

For more information, visit www.ridgeviewmedical.org and http://www.oneome.com.

Editor’s Note: Mayo Clinic has financial interest in the technology referenced in this news release. The revenue that Mayo Clinic will receive is used to support its not-for-profit mission in patient care, education and research.